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 he also made teenage girls sleep in bed with him to test his vow of chastity. so, not only so nonviolent that he became violent, but ALSO so celibate that he became a creepy predator.

metaphors can be accidental

TEXT OF COMIC:

In an old version of the video game Civilization, each simulated world leader had an aggressiveness level that could go up or down during the game.
But, because of the way the game handled math, that scale was kind of circular. If an aggressiveness level dropped below the minimum possible level, it looped around to the MAXIMUM possible level.
So, if you took the in-game version of Mahatma Gandhi, whose aggressiveness level was already as low as it could be, and you did something to make him even LESS aggressive– the opposite would happen, and he would suddenly start threatening you with nuclear weapons.
But the weirdest part? That whole concept– being so non-violent that one becomes violent– is kind of how Gandhi was in REAL LIFE.
He was so committed to not fighting, he called Hitler his friend, campaigned against going to war with the Nazis, and said that their millions of victims in concentration camps should just peacefully let themselves be killed and become martyrs.
Basically, he was so nonviolent that he made choices that had the same sort of effect that violence can have.
So you’re saying, Nuclear Gandhi was not actually a glitch, but a politically incisive metaphor?
Why couldn’t it be both?

MOUSEOVER TEXT: he also made teenage girls sleep in bed with him to test his vow of chastity. so, not only so nonviolent that he became violent, but ALSO so celibate that he became a creepy predator.

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