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if you were trying for twins and got only one kid, is that kid half-planned?

I think the latest an embryo can split into twins is in the late blastocyst stage, around 8 days after fertilization. Unlikely that Sharon’s mom found out about the pregnancy before then. But in any case, the positive pregnancy test wouldn’t indicate a particular one of the twins. The chemicals it checks for are hormones present in the mother’s body during pregnancy, not something produced by a specific embryo.

I guess the better question would be, when did she find out it was twins, and was it on an ultrasound, and, if so, whose picture did she see first on it? (And is there any way to know, at this point? I mean, they look exactly alike, and they had plenty of time to switch positions between then and birth.)

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1572

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apparently sclera can also mean scar or lesion, which is the real origin of the disease name


I think Abby doesn’t actually want to be paid for it, because losing her amateur status would mean she couldn’t compete in the linguistic olympics.

But, really, if Abby’s going to analyze words based on the origins of their parts, she should be using “amateur” to mean “lover,” not “one who does something without being paid.” (Though there is, of course, a certain connection between those. She must truly be a lover of linguistics if she volunteers to do it without financial gain.)

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1571

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well they ARE

I know I’m making a starling seem like a real hassle to keep. But honestly, it’s one of the easiest birds to care for. All birds make messes. And a starling’s messes are nothing compared to the biting and screaming you get from a parrot. Seriously, a parrot can take your finger off if it wants to. And cause hearing loss. And they haven’t been bred in captivity very long, so they don’t have any strong instinct not to hurt humans, like dogs do. Virtually all of them bite sometimes.

Parrots can be adorable, don’t get me wrong, but don’t get one if you aren’t prepared to deal with pain.

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1569

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 or she could drag the bike over to the sidewalk, push the button and cross when it says walk... and hope the button actually speeds up the light's cycle, not like some of the ones around here

I bet this really is the reason some cyclists run red lights. I don’t, because I’m hyper-aware of how easily I could get killed on my fragile little bike in a road full of big scary cars. But I know I feel VEeRRRY uncomfortable waiting for a light in front of a vehicle that could easily crush me, and whose driver is probably very annoyed that I can’t go as fast as he can.

Also explains why cyclists sometimes ride on sidewalks, even in places where it’s illegal. The pedestrians don’t want you there, but the motorists don’t want you in the road, and if you can’t make them both happy, you’ve got a lot of incentive to choose the ones who have the power to squash you if they aren’t happy.

All I can say is we gotta look to Holland as an example. They’ve got separate bike paths EVERYWHERE and it’s awesome.

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1567

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 he never will

The weird thing is I’m not sure that the word “starling” is actually related to the word “star.” A starling is called “Star” in German, but that’s different from the German word for “star,” which is “Stern.” Wikipedia’s page on the common starling says, “The Old English staer, later stare, and the Latin sturnus are both derived from an unknown Indo-European root dating back to the second millennium BC.”

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